Dr Sally Bayley.

‘Under certain circumstances there are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea’, so begins Henry James’s novel, A Portrait of A Lady. James’s novel begins with tea and ends in cross-cultural despair: a young American woman, Isabel Archer, running back to a tyrannous husband in Rome. Culturally, socially and personally speaking, Isabel fails to translate herself. She lacks any real ceremony and, in turn, any real dignity; instead she resorts to desperate duty. Her order of being, her personal and cultural choreography, is never her own…


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by TOAST ( 09.02.12 )

Or at least of those things, jaded and happy on the 22nd December, that we could remember…

A is for avaaz – giving the good people, the millions of ordinary people, a real voice. A great thing. www.avaaz.org

B is for Barry the Barber – a Geordie in Spitalfields via New York, great haircuts & beard trimming, good chat, good vibes. www.barrythebarber.com

C is for Christmas, still wonderful, longed for, magic, restful and festive in the right measure…


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by TOAST ( 22.12.11 )

Dr Sally Bayley.

When I was eight years old my grandmother taught me how to make tea. It has proved to be one of the most vital lessons of my life. Tea, in my household, was radically inclusive. Making it was my first lesson in socialising… In a house swarming with adults and children, you never made tea just for yourself, it was a community affair and took place in the depths of a large dark brown pot whose bottom seemed limitless. I peered down its deep dark shaft and thought of those striking miners I had heard about on the television and wondered if they were striking for more tea breaks as well as better pay…


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by TOAST ( 12.10.11 )

Next year marks the fifteenth anniversary of ‘Moro.’ The Moorish Mediterranean restaurant was started by husband and wife team Sam and Sam Clark in 1997 in what was then a ramshackle, partly boarded up Exmouth Market. The street has since become a thriving and vibrant parade with plenty of independent shops and many competing restaurants (surely in no small part because of Moro’s success)…


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by TOAST ( 08.08.11 )

Jo Craven.

It’s worth noting that foraging isn’t only for those with hedgerows at hand – there are urban foragers who marvel at the finds on Highbury Roundabout or in Richmond Park.


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by TOAST ( 17.05.11 )

Kim Trethowan.

As producers of a handmade, unpasteurised product, slow food is not a concept for us, but a way of life and working. This does not mean we are backward looking; indeed it places Gorwydd Farm at the centre of a modern, yet traditional, community of slow food devotees, made up of interwoven and ever increasing circles. What community actually is provokes significant debate, but for us it represents all the people and groups who have contributed in some way to who we are, what we do and why we do it…


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by TOAST ( 18.04.11 )

This entry comes from Kim Trethowan who along with Maugan works day-in-day-out at Gorwydd so knows the seasonal changes in the cheese and at the farm better than anyone.

Winter has a habit of letting you forget the warmth and colour of any other season and the one just passed has been no exception. Starting so early, Mother Nature turned the landscape monochrome and reminded us with every bitterly cold intake of breath just how powerful she can be. It’s all about survival during those dark months; keeping our heads down and clearing away snow and ice from the drive, trying to maintain the temperature in the dairy, guarding the equipment from failure… So when you catch the first signs of new life hugging the stark stone walls around the farm, it takes you totally by surprise…


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by TOAST ( 24.02.11 )


Jon Day.

We approach in darkness, in the chilled air of a winter morning. Billingsgate fish market keeps antisocial hours, opening at 5am and closing before 8.30. The squat, utilitarian building basks in the orange glow of sodium lamps and the 25,000 tonnes of fish that pass through here every year, now transported by road rather than river, have left their trace as an oily, mineral tang in the air…


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by TOAST ( 15.02.11 )
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